Continuing a long-standing tradition of funding ground-breaking research leading to innovations in the fields of human health, the environment, and economic development, the Foundation also believes in bringing quality science education to students ensuring the next generation continues to further advance this field. 

CURRENTLY FEATURED IN SCIENCE


PAST PROJECTS IN SCIENCE

Seahorse Distribution and Marine Conservation in Biscayne National Park

Seahorse Distribution and Marine Conservation in Biscayne National Park

2016 – Funding is provided to researchers at the University of British Columbia to study seahorse distribution and marine conservation in Biscayne National Park; the results of which supports community engagement and awareness and the proper management of seagrass beds in Biscayne National Park. Seagrass beds are a nursery to juvenile fish populations, providing the backbone needed to sustain nearly all ocean life, and they filter water ensuring the water is clean to support a robust coastal economy.

Making Water Pollution Visible in Biscayne Bay

Making Water Pollution Visible in Biscayne Bay

2011 – Funding is provided to Ocean Research & Conservation Association (ORCA), led by Edith Widder, well-known for having been the scientist who made history by filming a live Giant Squid (Architeuthis dux) in its natural habitat. This project mapped clusters of highly toxic areas in Biscayne Bay, which information was vital to the protection of valuable Florida resources, the health of the local population, and enforcement of the Clean Water Act.

Cyanobacterial Toxin BMAA in Elasmobrach Fishes from South Florida Coastal Waters

Cyanobacterial Toxin BMAA in Elasmobrach Fishes from South Florida Coastal Waters

2008 – HWHF begins a decade of funding ground-breaking research from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science linking the cyanobacterial toxin BMAA to neurodegenerative diseases. After supporting this research, the Foundation has more recently funded studies of BMAA in sharks and dolphin brains. This research is published in numerous scientific journals and receives significant media attention because of its implications for human health. A sample of the scientific publications are available at the following links: https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6651/8/8/238 and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6426197/

Development of Coral Nurseries to Restore Damaged Coral Reef Communities at Biscayne National Park

Development of Coral Nurseries to Restore Damaged Coral Reef Communities at Biscayne National Park

2007 + 2009 – Through a grant from the HWHF, the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science develops one of the world’s first coral nurseries to restore damaged coral reef communities in Biscayne National Park. Corals are the most diverse ecosystems on the planet, provide food to billions of people worldwide, and hold the key to curing many illnesses, including cancer.

Supporting the Pew Fellows Program in Marine Conservation

Supporting the Pew Fellows Program in Marine Conservation

2005 – HWHF begins funding the annual conference of the Pew Marine Fellows, a project of The Pew Charitable Trusts that awards financial support for midcareer professionals in the marine sciences whose future contributions to marine conservation are expected to be significant.  As of 2019, 172 marine experts from 39 countries have been selected as Pew Marine Fellows.   Fellowship projects have led to designations of new protected areas, improved fisheries management, and better conservation of marine wildlife.

Research Project to Protect Sailfish/Billfish

Research Project to Protect Sailfish/Billfish

1998 + 2002 – The University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science receives funding by the HWHF to study the spawning behavior and nursery habitat of Billfish, which was a first-step towards the protection of habitats critical for migratory fish.

Support of the Water Quality Studies in the lower south Florida Keys (Looe Key National Marine Sanctuary), the only high-frequency long-term water quality monitoring program for a coral reef ecosystem anywhere in the world

Support of the Water Quality Studies in the lower south Florida Keys (Looe Key National Marine Sanctuary), the only high-frequency long-term water quality monitoring program for a coral reef ecosystem anywhere in the world

1998 + 2000 – HWHF provides funding for Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution to conduct water quality studies in the Looe Key National Marine Sanctuary, which represents the longest low-level nutrient record for a coral reef anywhere in the world. Recently, in 2019, this resulted in a groundbreaking publication attributing coral bleaching to not only increased water temperatures but excess nitrogen as well. To view the publication, you can visit the following link: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00227-019-3538-9 .  For a press release about the publication, you can visit this link: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-07/fau-tyo071019.php


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